1. Reblogged from: stelmarias
  2. rwby-rose:

    can we talk

    about how nora hit yang so hard that it took her a minute and thirty-six seconds to finish falling down

    i’m scared

    Reblogged from: rwby-rose
  3. madhaywood:

    i think we all know what the best part about that was

    image

    Reblogged from: madhaywood
  4. sixpenceee:

    The following is a white blood cell chasing a bacterium. It eventually ends up swallowing it. The following white blood cell is specifically a neutrophil. They end up ingesting the microbe a process known as phagocytosis. 

    VIDEO

    Reblogged from: molecularlifesciences
  5. ohawkguy:

    the notebook problem: you see a notebook. you want to buy the notebook. but you know you have like TEN OTHER NOTEBOOKS. most which are STILL EMPTY. you don’t need to notebook. you’re probably not gonna use the notebook anyway. what’s the point? DONT BUY THE NOTEBOOK. you buy the notebook.

    Reblogged from: joker-ace
  6. godotal:

omgbuglen:

How to use sand to freak people out

Imagine if some guy was tripping and saw the woman, runs up to help her and she just crumbles apart in his hands. That’s gonna take the trip south.

    godotal:

    omgbuglen:

    How to use sand to freak people out

    Imagine if some guy was tripping and saw the woman, runs up to help her and she just crumbles apart in his hands. That’s gonna take the trip south.

    Reblogged from: torashii
  7. ask-thehooded:

    OH MY FUCKING THANK YOU

    Reblogged from: torashii
  8. sunworldstories:

    by Chiara Bautista

    We are absolutely in love!

    Reblogged from: darkslover
  9. ichibrose:

    i’ve entered a whole new level of hell

    Reblogged from: alchimiel
  10. memelord420blazeit:

    Imagine if allmates had poor reception sometimes so yOU SEE PEOPLE HOLDING THEIR ROBOT ANIMALS UP LIKE SIMBA TO TRY AND GET A SIGNAL LIKE OH MY GD O

    Reblogged from: positivelysinister
  11. There is no body cavity that cannot be reached with a number fourteen needle and a good strong arm.
    Reblogged from: medicalschool
  12. humansofnewyork:

"She was filled with regret before she died. She felt like she’d failed us as a mother tremendously.""Did she say something to you about it?""She never said anything, so I don’t have any tangible proof that she had regrets. But she had a very bad substance abuse problem. And I know she always wanted to be a good mother. So I separate my mom from her disease. I always imagine that my mom and an alcoholic were living in the same body. And I know that my mom loved us. And that she hated the alcoholic."

    humansofnewyork:

    "She was filled with regret before she died. She felt like she’d failed us as a mother tremendously."
    "Did she say something to you about it?"
    "She never said anything, so I don’t have any tangible proof that she had regrets. But she had a very bad substance abuse problem. And I know she always wanted to be a good mother. So I separate my mom from her disease. I always imagine that my mom and an alcoholic were living in the same body. And I know that my mom loved us. And that she hated the alcoholic."

    Reblogged from: humansofnewyork
  13. biomedicalephemera:

    Our Three (Brain) Mothers

    Protecting our brain and central nervous system are the meninges, derived from the Greek term for “membrane”. You may have heard of meningitis - this is when the innermost layer of the meninges swells, often due to infection, and can cause nerve or brain damage, and sometimes death.

    There are three meningeal layers: the dura mater, arachnoid mater, and pia mater. In Latin, “mater” means “mother”. The term comes from the enveloping nature of these membranes, but we later learned how apt it was, because of how protective and essential the meningeal layers are.

    ——————————————————-

    • The dura mater is the outermost and toughest membrane. Its name means “tough mother”.

    The dura is most important for keeping cerebrospinal fluid where it belongs, and for allowing the safe transport of blood to and from the brain. This layer is also water-tight - if it weren’t, our cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) would leak out, and our central nervous system would have no cushion! Its leathery qualities mean that even when the skull is broken, more often than not, the dura (and the brain it encases) is not punctured.

    • The arachnoid mater is the middle membrane. Its name means "spider-like mother", because of its web-like nature.

    The arachnoid is attached directly to the deep side of the dura, and has small protrusions into the sinuses within the dura, which allows for CSF to return to the bloodstream and not become stagnant. It also has very fine, web-like projections downward, which attach to the pia mater. However, it doesn’t contact the pia mater in the same way as the dura: the CSF flows between the two meningeal layers, in the subarachnoid space. The major superficial blood vessels are on top of the arachnoid, and below the dura.

    • Pia mater is the innermost membrane, which follows the folds (sulci) of the brain and spinal cord most closely. Its name means “tender mother”.

    The pia is what makes sure the CSF stays between the meninges, and doesn’t just get absorbed into the brain or spinal cord. It also allows for new CSF from the ventricles to be shunted into the subarachnoid space, and provides pathways for blood vessels to nourish the brain. While the pia mater is very thin, it is water-tight, just like the dura mater. The pia is also the primary blood-brain barrier, making sure that no plasma proteins or organic molecules penetrate into the CSF. 

    Because of this barrier, medications which need to reach the brain or meninges must be administered directly into the CSF.

    Images:
    Anatomy: Practical and Surgical. Henry Gray, 1909.

    Reblogged from: anthrocentric
  14. scienceyoucanlove:

    Today on ‘just vaccinate your fucking children already’ news: 

    Childhood vaccines are safe. Seriously.

    By Jen Christensen and Nadia Kounang, CNN

    (CNN) — Children should get vaccinated against preventable and potentially deadly diseases. Period.

    That’s what a project that screened more than 20,000 scientific titles and 67 papers on vaccine safety concludes this week. The review appears in the latest edition of the medical journal Pediatrics.

    The evidence strongly suggests that side effects from vaccines are incredibly rare, the study authors said. They found no ties between vaccines and the rising number of children with autism, as a small but vocal group of anti-vaccine activists, including actors Jenny McCarthy and Jim Carey, have said.

    (Retracted autism study an ‘elaborate fraud’)

    The review also found no link between vaccines and childhood leukemia, something that was suggested inearlier studies.

    The researchers found that some vaccines did cause a few adverse effects but it was only for a tiny fraction of the population.

    There was evidence that the meningococcal vaccine can lead to anaphylaxis — a severe, whole-body allergic reaction — in children allergic to ingredients in the vaccine. Other studies found the MMR vaccine was linked to seizures.

    "Vaccines, like any other medication, aren’t 100% risk free," said Dr. Ari Brown an Austin, Texas-based pediatrician and author of the popular book “Baby 411,” who was not involved with the study.

    "You have a sore arm, redness at the injection site. Those are the things we see commonly. Fortunately the serious adverse effects is extremely rare."

    Brown said parents ask her how safe vaccines are all the time. Some patients also ask if they should delay or stagger the vaccinations. She counsels against that practice. She said the younger the child, the more danger these diseases present.

    "By delaying the vaccines you’re putting your child at risk," Brown said.

    (Study: Don’t delay measles vaccine)

    The positive effects of vaccines dramatically outweigh the bad, experts said.

    An editorial accompanying the study calls vaccines “one of the most successful public health achievements of the 20th century.”

    Because of vaccines, many diseases that plagued children for centuries have all but been eliminated.

    "There were good reasons that these diseases were targeted for vaccine development since they are so life-threatening," said Dr. Carrie Byington, vice-chair for research in the University of Utah’s pediatrics department, and the new chair for the American Academy of Pediatrics committee on infectious diseases.

    Millions of Americans live longer on average because of the protection vaccines provide. Life expectancy has gone up in the United States by more than 30 years. Infant mortality decreased from 100 deaths per 1000 to 7 between the 1900s and 2000. 

    read more from CNN (also links to study findings are in parentheses throughout the text)

    also CNN link, goes to article and video, video starts on it’s own so be careful.

    Reblogged from: anthrocentric
  15. the first half of the book version of howl's moving castle

    • Howl: STOP CLEANING MY FCKING HOUSE
    • Sophie: NEVER
    Reblogged from: joker-ace
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